An Investigation into the Use and Processing of Hide in Iron Age Shields from Denmark 

  

Iron Age shield rim with wooden shield board, layers of hide and bronze shield rim fitting (Photo: Jacob Nyborg Andreassen, SoCA)

Iron Age shield rim with wooden shield board, layers of hide and bronze shield rim fitting (Photo: Jacob Nyborg Andreassen, SoCA)

While the southern Scandinavian region can boast of many relatively well-preserved Iron Age shield finds – such as those stemming from the war booty sacrifices – it is obvious that several important questions regarding their construction remain unanswered. This is particularly true with regards to the thin organic layers that seemingly once covered the shield boards but which have long since perished in the majority of archaeological finds. While it is generally accepted that these layers represent some constructional reinforcement (a facing or edge) of hide or gut, there remains to be undertaken a specialized study to determine the exact nature of these materials, especially with regards to tanning processes. To illuminate these aspects of Iron Age shield construction, therefore, this project seeks to undertake multiple microanalyses of samples collected from a range of well-preserved Danish shield finds dating to the Iron Age, ranging from c. 350 BC to 750 AD.

The study is an interdisciplinary project and collaborative effort between conservator-restorers, René Larsen (PhD) and Dorte V. P. Sommer (Cand.scient.cons.), and archaeologists, Xenia Pauli Jensen (PhD) and Rolf Warming (Cand.mag.).